Knowledge base: Adam Mickiewicz University

Settings and your account

Back

US Foreign Aid towards Democracy Promotion in the Middle East 2003-2013: A Case Study of Egypt, Iraq, and Jordan

Abdellateef Al-Weshah

Abstract

The study is important due to its immediate nature – the drawn conclusions can be applied to reflect on the contemporary policy of American aid and the US attitudes regarding the promotion of democracy worldwide. The main problem illustrated in the three respective case studies consists in the fact that democracy promotion is not a process driven by the sheer appreciation of the ideology related to the considered system of government. Allowing people to become involved in making decisions about country’s affairs frequently becomes secondary to other objectives, be them securing economic conditions, securing influences in a region or maintaining control. In this regard, the year 2003 marks the temporary departure of the USA from its post-Cold War bottom-up approach advocating the use of ‘soft’ solutions rather than military power. The study reveals that such shifts in democratization policies can prove counterproductive and costly to global superpowers. The performed analysis shows the progress made in three countries, each of which was assisted according to a different scheme. However, none of the cases is as complex as the situation in Iraq where hard power was employed. The campaign proved least predictable and highly resource-consuming requiring long-term presence of both military and civilian forces. Thus, the study also constitutes a constructive criticism of the top-down approach to democratization in the 21st century.
Record ID
UAM7a8a64b89fe54cbdb1607b1a3b4437d2
Diploma type
Doctor of Philosophy
Author
Abdellateef Al-Weshah Abdellateef Al-Weshah,, Undefined Affiliation
Title in Polish
Wsparcie Stanów Zjednoczonych skierowane na promowanie demokracji na Bliskim Wschodzie w latach 2003-2013 na przykładach Egiptu, Iraku i Jordanii
Title in English
US Foreign Aid towards Democracy Promotion in the Middle East 2003-2013: A Case Study of Egypt, Iraq, and Jordan
Language
en English
Certifying Unit
Faculty of Political Science and Journalism (SNs/WNPiD/FoPSaJ)
Discipline
media studies / (social studies) / (social studies)
Scientific discipline (2.0)
5.4 communication and media studies
Defense Date
20-10-2016
End date
20-10-2016
Supervisor
URL
http://hdl.handle.net/10593/15017 opening in a new tab
Keywords in English
United States, Middle East, Foreign Aid, democracy promotion
Abstract in English
The study is important due to its immediate nature – the drawn conclusions can be applied to reflect on the contemporary policy of American aid and the US attitudes regarding the promotion of democracy worldwide. The main problem illustrated in the three respective case studies consists in the fact that democracy promotion is not a process driven by the sheer appreciation of the ideology related to the considered system of government. Allowing people to become involved in making decisions about country’s affairs frequently becomes secondary to other objectives, be them securing economic conditions, securing influences in a region or maintaining control. In this regard, the year 2003 marks the temporary departure of the USA from its post-Cold War bottom-up approach advocating the use of ‘soft’ solutions rather than military power. The study reveals that such shifts in democratization policies can prove counterproductive and costly to global superpowers. The performed analysis shows the progress made in three countries, each of which was assisted according to a different scheme. However, none of the cases is as complex as the situation in Iraq where hard power was employed. The campaign proved least predictable and highly resource-consuming requiring long-term presence of both military and civilian forces. Thus, the study also constitutes a constructive criticism of the top-down approach to democratization in the 21st century.

Uniform Resource Identifier
https://researchportal.amu.edu.pl/info/phd/UAM7a8a64b89fe54cbdb1607b1a3b4437d2/

Back
Confirmation
Are you sure?
Report incorrect data on this page