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Contemporary religious conflicts in Lemkovyna

Andrzej Stachowiak

Abstract

The term ‘Lemkovyna’ is a definition of a former ethnographical region, covering Beskid Niski, Eastern part of the Beskid Sadecki and Western part of the Bieszczady, which was inhabited until the end of 1947 by the Lemks – one of group of Ruthenian Carpathian highlanders, who counted circa 100-150 thousand people before the world war II. In this area there was 187 Lemkian villages and settlements at that time. As a result of the post-war deportation this population is now dispersed over western and northern Poland, as well as Ukraine. Only some of the Lemks stayed in their ‘homeland in the mountains’ or returned there in the 50's. Nowadays they stand for about 25% of the whole population of that area. The rest of the inhabitants consists of Polish post-war immigrants from different parts of the country, in the majority however – from neighboring, overpopulated foot-mountain villages. The term ‘contemporary’ with reference to religion conflict issue described in this work means a period since 1947 (the last stage of the Lemks’ deportation) to the present day (the beginning of XXI century). The main task of this paper was a comprehensive description and analysis of religious conflicts in Lemkovyna, which happened in this period or may happen in the future. Another task was the attempt to describe a behavioral model of local society in case of religious conflict and to work out a way to mitigate a religious quarrel.
Record ID
UAMc0abae44285540e7af85d90b866b05be
Diploma type
Doctor of Philosophy
Author
Andrzej Stachowiak Andrzej Stachowiak,, Undefined Affiliation
Title in Polish
Współczesne konflikty wyznaniowe na Łemkowszczyźnie
Title in English
Contemporary religious conflicts in Lemkovyna
Language
pol (pl) Polish
Certifying Unit
Faculty of History (FoH)
Discipline
ethnology / (humanities) / (humanities)
Scientific discipline (2.0)
1.6 culture and religion sciences
Status
Finished
Defense Date
24-11-2010
Title date
24-11-2010
Supervisor
Andrzej Brencz Andrzej Brencz,, to_translate_Wydział Antropologii i Kulturoznawstwa [nowa struktura organizacyjna] (SNH/WAiK)Szkoła Nauk Humanistycznych [nowa struktura organizacyjna] (SNH)
URL
http://hdl.handle.net/10593/676 Opening in a new tab
Keywords in English
Religious conflict, Religion, Lemks, Lemkovyna
Abstract in English
The term ‘Lemkovyna’ is a definition of a former ethnographical region, covering Beskid Niski, Eastern part of the Beskid Sadecki and Western part of the Bieszczady, which was inhabited until the end of 1947 by the Lemks – one of group of Ruthenian Carpathian highlanders, who counted circa 100-150 thousand people before the world war II. In this area there was 187 Lemkian villages and settlements at that time. As a result of the post-war deportation this population is now dispersed over western and northern Poland, as well as Ukraine. Only some of the Lemks stayed in their ‘homeland in the mountains’ or returned there in the 50's. Nowadays they stand for about 25% of the whole population of that area. The rest of the inhabitants consists of Polish post-war immigrants from different parts of the country, in the majority however – from neighboring, overpopulated foot-mountain villages. The term ‘contemporary’ with reference to religion conflict issue described in this work means a period since 1947 (the last stage of the Lemks’ deportation) to the present day (the beginning of XXI century). The main task of this paper was a comprehensive description and analysis of religious conflicts in Lemkovyna, which happened in this period or may happen in the future. Another task was the attempt to describe a behavioral model of local society in case of religious conflict and to work out a way to mitigate a religious quarrel.

Uniform Resource Identifier
https://researchportal.amu.edu.pl/info/phd/UAMc0abae44285540e7af85d90b866b05be/
URN
urn:amu-prod:UAMc0abae44285540e7af85d90b866b05be

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