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The culture of self- knowledge. Decline or development?

Szymon Wawrzyniak

Abstract

Among many tips on life given to us as a legacy of tradition, the encouragement to get to know oneself plays a particularly important role. This work arose from questions about the fate of the idea “Know thyself” in today's world. Taking the contemporary reality into consideration, the reality that very often appears as opaque, complex, full of risks and threats to a man "immersed" in it, it would seem that the words of the oracle at Delphi gain an exceptional relevance. But today there are plenty of voices seeking a problem in self-cognition rather than a solution to it and much more often we can hear that the time of the Delphic maxim has already come to an end. How do we refer to these theses? Is it really the case that the era in which the mankind learned to think of them in terms of "a being to be explored" is a thing of the past? If so, what would this end mean, should we enjoy it or should we mourn it? Should we reconcile ourselves with it or seek to restore the Delphic ideal its former glory? Or maybe the theses, that are so often aired today, are simply premature and what seems to be an end to their authors should be seen rather as a transformation, a change within an existing tradition? I do not give straight answers to these questions but I turn to the history of this issue in the European culture. As I argued, by rethinking a topic that is of interest for us in terms of its different historical scenes (antiquity, Christian culture, modern world), we get more insight into our current situation.
Record ID
UAMc5bc64a551684487bb6743513531a3d2
Diploma type
Doctor of Philosophy
Author
Szymon Wawrzyniak Szymon Wawrzyniak,, Undefined Affiliation
Title in Polish
Kultura poznania siebie. Upadek czy rozwój?
Title in English
The culture of self- knowledge. Decline or development?
Language
pl Polish
Certifying Unit
Faculty of Social Sciences (FoSS)
Discipline
philosophy / (humanities) / (humanities)
Scientific discipline (2.0)
1.2 philosophy
Defense Date
19-06-2012
End date
19-06-2012
Supervisor
URL
http://hdl.handle.net/10593/2796 opening in a new tab
Keywords in English
Culture; Self- knowledge; Self- cognition; Identity; Subjectivity
Abstract in English
Among many tips on life given to us as a legacy of tradition, the encouragement to get to know oneself plays a particularly important role. This work arose from questions about the fate of the idea “Know thyself” in today's world. Taking the contemporary reality into consideration, the reality that very often appears as opaque, complex, full of risks and threats to a man "immersed" in it, it would seem that the words of the oracle at Delphi gain an exceptional relevance. But today there are plenty of voices seeking a problem in self-cognition rather than a solution to it and much more often we can hear that the time of the Delphic maxim has already come to an end. How do we refer to these theses? Is it really the case that the era in which the mankind learned to think of them in terms of "a being to be explored" is a thing of the past? If so, what would this end mean, should we enjoy it or should we mourn it? Should we reconcile ourselves with it or seek to restore the Delphic ideal its former glory? Or maybe the theses, that are so often aired today, are simply premature and what seems to be an end to their authors should be seen rather as a transformation, a change within an existing tradition? I do not give straight answers to these questions but I turn to the history of this issue in the European culture. As I argued, by rethinking a topic that is of interest for us in terms of its different historical scenes (antiquity, Christian culture, modern world), we get more insight into our current situation.

Uniform Resource Identifier
https://researchportal.amu.edu.pl/info/phd/UAMc5bc64a551684487bb6743513531a3d2/

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